Sunday, August 20, 2017

Thomas' First Illustrated Story -- Fourth Book

Once upon a time, there was a Thomas named Thomas, and there was a painting on the wall.  And the painting came to life.

The End.


Sunday, August 6, 2017

Book 565


Here Comes the Easter Cat, written by Deborah Underwood, illustrated by Claudia Rueda, Dial Books, 2014.

This book is an excellent example of the ideal relationship between the text and the illustrations.  The text on its own would not make sense, and the illustrations on their own would not make sense, but put them together and you have one adorably hilarious Easter book. 

Book 564

Hallowe'en Party, by Agatha Christie, Berkley Books, 1969.

I love Hercule Poirot -- of course -- and Ariadne Oliver, and the mystery itself was quite good, but there were still some rather large flaws in this book. 

All the charm was sucked out of Agatha Christie's writing by her rants (through several characters) about the 'youth of today', the mental health system, and the criminal justice system. I might have been fine if only one or two characters spouted negativity of their choice, but they all did, repeatedly, and that grew tiresome. 




Book 563

Mr. Parker Pyne, Detective, by Agatha Christie, Berkley Books, 1934.

Mr. Parker Pyne seems like a cross between Poirot, Lord Peter Wimsey, and a plain ordinary accountant.  He is quite charming.  The stories, however, do not quite measure up to Christie at her best.


Book 562

Dumb Witness, by Agatha Christie, Berkley Books, 1937.

I found this Agatha Christie mystery especially engaging. Possibly because I am partial to small dogs named Bob. And partially because I did not guess the ending. But mostly because it was a well-crafted, engaging story.